Latest Cafe Post Is Up

I have another post up at the Episcopal Cafe. This one is not part of my on-going Church History series. Rather, it’s an ad hoc reflection whose original core was actually a suggestion from bls–it’s just taken me a while to get the whole thing out…

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4 Responses to Latest Cafe Post Is Up

  1. Nice work as always.

    Natural religion: with the oscular cross your daughter has come close to a practice that evolved among Catholics in some Latin countries (Italy and Spanish-speaking) of forming a cross with the thumb and index finger and kissing the thumb after crossing yourself.

    I have a predisposed bias against worship dumbed-down.

    I agree.

    Does she understand what everything means? No, not yet.

    Do I understand what everything means? No and that’s fine; only God does. (The point the dean of the Schoolmen himself, the Angelic Doctor, made at the end of his life.)

    I didn’t know M was Presbyterian to begin with.

  2. Michelle says:

    “Natural religion: with the oscular cross your daughter has come close to a practice that evolved among Catholics in some Latin countries (Italy and Spanish-speaking) of forming a cross with the thumb and index finger and kissing the thumb after crossing yourself.”

    Both resemble the catholic tradition of making the sign of the cross on the forehead, lips and heart at the beginning of the gospel reading. Most do it with thumb and forefinger and it may look like kissing the thumb afterwards. Its really a silent prayer.

    + May the gospel be in my thoughts
    + on my lips
    + and in my heart.

    Each + represents one of those thumb and forfinger crosses made over the forehead, lips and heart.

  3. Michelle says:

    There are quite a few Episcopalians who do this in my parish, but I suspect that most are former Catholics.

  4. bls says:

    I love it! If you like the Anglican Liturgical Bow, you’ll love the Episcopal Oscular Cross.

    (You should probably send it to these people, who list all kinds of customs and ritual observances, and explain their origins and when they’re done. They might be interested in adding the E.O.C. to their list…. ;-) )

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