More on Religious Art

M is teaching Sunday School again tomorrow and didn’t like any of the activities listed in her curriculum. So we did some brainstorming.

After considering some interesting options like Playdough, etc., she said, “Hey, wouldn’t it be cool if we could do a Where’s Waldo kind of picture search? Kids that age like that…” (We’re dealing with a whole group together split about half-n-half between those who read and those who can’t so coming up with an activity for all of them can be tricky.)

So one thing led to another and a nother and now we’ve got a slideshow of images of the baptism of Jesus from the Renaissance to the present and an accompanying sheet with ten little snippets for them to locate. The plan is to go through all of the pictures slowly first—everybody look and don’t say anything if you see something—then go through them again, point out the “found” items, and talk a little bit about the picture and what it does with the story.

I absolutely fell in love with one of them and given the earlier discussion on religious art decided it had to be posted. So, without further ado, a triptych despicting the baptism of OLASJC by G. David (1505):

baptism_of_jesus-008

Now I just need to figure out what I’m going to tell the adults about the Revised Common Lectionary (and try to keep it civil…)

This entry was posted in Church Year. Bookmark the permalink.

9 Responses to More on Religious Art

  1. Anastasia says:

    someone please stop all the revisions. It’s making me insane.

  2. bls says:

    Wow, hat’s a great idea! Kids get exposure to both art and the story that way.

    I think one big problem we all have in this our modern world is a drop in attention span – and this will help with that, too, since it forces people to look hard and then be silent.

    Nice going!

  3. It worked pretty well! But I should have gone with 6 pictures rather than 9—we haven’t worked on the attention span for *that* long yet…

  4. bls says:

    Yeah, for kids it’s got to be just a few things at first. But they can really get into things if they’re in a mind to – as I’m sure you’ve noticed when they are watching TV programs they like….

  5. Jan Hotze says:

    Oh, how much do I loathe the Revised Common Lectionary? Let me count the ways….how in the name of all that is holy did we ever agree to use this, the polictically correct has led us into a wasteland…it is so bad.

  6. Yes, the RCL is certainly not my favorite, either–but political correctness is only *one* of the many reasons to not like it…

    I did manage to stay mostly civil about it.

  7. Thanks, Brian–bls has pointed me to this earlier (and Fr. Mead and I have discussed it…). I agree with Fr. Mead on a number of points but I also come at it from a different angle and would raise a number of other issues that he doesn’t touch on.

  8. Brian M says:

    Fr. Mead is the man. The SMV Archives project he is working on is fantastic–all of the Daily Mass and Daily Office lections (the latter with the alternate year’s OT lesson) in RSV translations, eventually for every day of the liturgical cycles:

    http://www.stmvirgin.org/archives/article107261c1663992.htm

Comments are closed.